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Further Reading

Here you’ll find a regularly-updated list with links to other digitally-based art history and humanities projects, as well as individuals and organizations whose mission or research interests align with AH4A‘s.

Medieval POC (A Twitter and Tumblr dedicated to increasing the visibility of the history of people of color in European art.)
Twitter
Tumblr

Tabloid Art History (A Twitter and Instagram that post comparisons of art from various periods with photos of celebrities. They’ve also released a zine, available for free online and for purchase in physical form.)
Twitter
Instagram
Zine

McMansion Hell (A blog dedicated to roasting “McMansions” as well as deconstructing why exactly they are bad, in architectural history terms.)

The Material Collective (A group of primarily medievalist art historians dedicated to fostering “a safe space for alternative ways of thinking about objects.” Also dedicated to academic/art historical activism.)

Kimberly R. Drew (The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s social media manager, and the founder of the blog Black Contemporary Art.)

Hyperallergic (A progressive art news website that describes itself as “a forum for playful, serious, and radical perspectives on art and culture in the world today.)

Dash-Amerikan: Keeping Up With the Social Media Ecologies of the Kardashians (A digital project through the University of Virginia’s Scholars Lab that looks at the Kardashian-Jenner family and their various properties and social media presences through a critical lens.)

The Incluseum (In their own words: “The Incluseum is a project based in Seattle, Washington that advances new ways of being a museum through critical discourse, community building and collaborative practice related to inclusion in museums.” Includes a blog, a record of their exhibit The Power of Place, as well as tools to assist in catalyzing change in museum contexts.)

The CORAI Project (An organization founded by independent art historian Andrea Iaroc, CORAI stands for “Creating Opportunities for Representing Art history Inclusively,” and “seeks to provide springboard grants to art historians that are working to change the field, those that are challenging old parameters and theories, and those that are creating new philosophies.”)

Women Also Know History (A database of women historians, including art historians, dedicated to promoting women historians’ work. Find Allyson Healey’s database listing here.)

Study the Humanities (A toolkit for educators and administrators on how to promote the humanities to undergraduates. Also useful for students and parents to make the case for why the humanities are useful and necessary in our society. Created by the National Humanities Alliance.)

 

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